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Would You Like a Down Payment for Christmas?

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REW.ca
December 5, 2017






Piggy Bank

Third of baby-boomers giving adult children “living inheritances” for home purchases, finds survey

Having enjoyed unprecedented rises in the values of their homes recently, one in three Canadian baby-boomers (ages 52-71) in the four largest cities are helping their adult children buy a home by gifting a large sum towards their down payment, according to a survey released December 5.

The survey of more than 2,000 boomers in Vancouver, Toronto, Calgary and Montreal, by the Mustel Group on behalf of Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, found that intergenerational wealth transfer is fuelling the home purchases of many Millennial children.

One-third of respondents said that they either have given, or plan to give, a “living inheritance” to enable their adult children to get into the real estate market. Calgary respondents were the most likely to do so, at 41%, followed by Vancouver boomers at 36% and Torontonians at 35%.

Two in three “living inheritance” givers of real estate funds said there was or will be a specific trigger that prompts their gift – most likely to be the sale of their financial investments, cited by 21%, and the sale of their primary home, cited by 17%.

The survey pointed out that income inequality is also transferring from one generation to the next. Sotheby’s reported that respondents with annual household incomes of over $100,000 were almost twice as likely to give money to help their children buy real estate: 49% said they plan to or have done so, compared with 27% of those with household incomes below $100,000.  

The median “living inheritance” given by those with household incomes under $100,000 is approximately $25,000, with 72% of living inheritances falling under $50,000. But for boomers earning more than $100K a year, only 53% of their “living inheritances” were under $50,000; 25% were $50,000-$100,000, 10% were $100,000-$200,000, 10% $200,000-$500,000, and the remainder over $500,000.

The report said that funds gifted by urban boomers for real estate purchases are largely used by recipients to buy their first home as a primary residence (rather than an investment or vacation property). Nationally, 82% indicated their gift would be used for a first home, rising to 90% in Vancouver, followed by Calgary, Toronto and Montreal at 86%, 83% and 74% respectively.

Overall, 44% of “living inheritance” givers believe that their recipient(s) would not have been or will not be able to make their home purchase without their gift.

Brad Henderson, President and CEO of Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, said, “Baby boomers affect the Canadian real estate market on multiple levels: as direct consumers who drive housing demand and product mix, as arbiters of market confidence, and as indirect influencers through their financial support of next generation home buyers. Anecdotally, we have known that funds from the ‘Bank of Mom and Dad’ have been flowing into the market – this new report sheds light onto some of the critical details.”

The report follows news last week that the CREA is calling for changes to the Home Buyer’s Plan to allow for the transfer of funds from parents’ RRSPs to their adult children in order to help them buy real estate.

 

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Joannah Connolly has been editor and content manager of REW.ca since May 2014. Joannah has appeared on major local TV outlets as a real estate commentator, and has moderated and spoken on several industry panels. During this time, she also spent two years hosting the Real Estate Therapist radio show on Roundhouse Radio 98.3FM. A dual Canadian-British citizen, Joannah has 20 years of journalism experience in Vancouver and London, with a prior background in construction, architecture and business media.
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