Vancouver

Five Great Things About Living in … False Creek

This unique waterfront community that emerged in the 1970s is changing all the time. Here's why it's a neighbourhood that embodies the West Coast life

By
REW.ca
May 29, 2015






False Creek and floating homes on Granville Island

The False Creek area of Vancouver has seen much change in recent years, and will only continue to grow – so when talking about the neighbourhood, it’s important to define what we mean. MLS® defines the False Creek neighbourhood as the area between Burrard and Cambie, from the waterfront to West 6th Ave. That means it includes Granville Island and much of the seawall, but not the Olympic Village area, now the Village on False Creek, which MLS® places in Mount Pleasant West.

False Creek became a unique waterfront community in the 1970s, when the former industrial land was developed into a planned community with plenty of green space and prime waterfront views. It’s now dealing with some uncertainty, as two-thirds of residents live on leasehold land, with many of the leases set to expire in 2036. What that means for the future of real estate in the community remains to be seen, but for now, it’s a hotbed of culture and recreational activities. Here are five great things about living in this slice of the city that embodies Vancouver’s West Coast vibe.

1. Granville Island

Granville Island is a cultural hub for the whole city, with Performance Works and the Arts Club anchoring the theatre scene, which also includes plenty of smaller stages. The Granville Island Public Market is a one-stop shop for fresh produce, local meats and cheeses and flowers, among other goods, while the farmers’ market that runs from June to October offers opportunities to buy direct from local growers. Add in the great bars and restaurants with sunny patios and stunning views, and it’s easy to see why Granville Island is a favourite draw for locals and tourists alike.

2. The Seawall

The South False Creek seawall offers some of the best views in Vancouver, with views north to downtown’s glass towers and the North Shore Mountains, east to Science World, and west to the Burrard Street Bridge and English Bay. It passes by marinas full of gleaming yachts as well as plenty of green space, including the off-leash dog park at Charleson Park.

3. Water Taxis

Is there a sweeter way to get around the city? The False Creek neighbourhood has two water taxi stops – at Granville Island and Stamps Landing. The Aquabus and False Creek Ferry boats connect the neighbourhood to points along the north and south banks of False Creek, including Yaletown, the Olympic Village and Vanier Park. Locals can buy monthly or yearly passes that make these charming boats a legitimate commuting option.

4. Public Art

It’s hard to miss the Giants, a major public art project unveiled at Granville Island’s Ocean Concrete yard. Brazilian artists Os Gemeos transformed the concrete silos into six massive characters as party of the Vancouver Biennale. Love Your Beans, by Canadian artist Cosimo Cavallaro, is another Vancouver Biennale exhibition in False Creek, this one at Charleson Park.

5. False Creek

What would False Creek the neighbourhood be without False Creek, the glimmering inlet that gives the neighbourhood its name? False Creek offers plenty of opportunities for recreation, including sailing, kayaking, stand-up-paddleboarding and dragonboating. What better way to embrace the West Coast life?

View False Creek MLS® listings and open houses.


Christina Newberry is a Vancouver-based writer and editor who writes lifestyle and travel stories for publications both online and in print. When she's not travelling, Christina can be found exploring Vancouver's unique neighbourhoods or puttering in her community garden plot.
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